Recent Posts

What Causes Fires?

8/30/2022 (Permalink)

  1. Cooking Equipment 

When a pot and pan splatter grease, it can take seconds to cause a fire. When cooking stay close by, especially if using oil or high temperatures. Keep combustibles away from the heat source (e.g. oven mitts, dish towels, paper towels).

  1. Electrical Equipment
  2. Make sure your outlets aren't overloaded 
  3. Don't have electrical wires under heavy equipment 
  4. Your Electrical appliances don't have loose or frayed cords/plugs

3.Candles 

Keep candles on a level surface, away from combustible materials and out of reach of children or pets. Always blow them out before leaving the house. 

  1. Barbecues 

Use Barbecues away from the house, deck rails, and tree limbs. Maintenance them on a regular basis, clean removable parts (inside and out) with soapy water. Check for potential leaks in the connections by spraying them with soapy water; Watch if bubbles form when you open the gas.

  1. Fire Pits
  2. You may need a permit depending on where you live to have a fire. 
  3. You have to have a permit if your fire is bigger than 2 ft tall and 3 ft diameter. 
  4. Keep at least 25 ft away from structures and tree limbs. 
  5. Use a screen over your fire to keep the sparks from flying 
  6. Keep a bucket of water or a hose close by.

Summer Fires

8/30/2022 (Permalink)

With the heat of the summer, please keep in mind that the sun and winds will have dried out a lot of the surrounding plants and bushes.  So, if you plan on a bonfire, follow these tips in order to prevent a property or brush fire.

  • Rake your yard or bag your grass clippings before starting a fire.
  • Remove yard waste and dead branches around your property.
  • Follow your local laws and regulations pertaining to burning and open flames.
  • Dampen the ground around your fire pit and under it as well if you have a free-standing pit.
  • Place your fire pit on pavers or cement.
  • Keep a hose nearby.
  • Never throw trash into the fire
  • Don’t ever leave a fire unattended.
  • Make sure children and pets stay 3 feet away from the fire.
  • Fully extinguish the flames with sand and a bucket of water when the evening is over.

Embers stay hot for hours when extinguished.  When the fun is over, walk through the yard to clean up chairs and garbage that could easily ignite.  Run water on the pit until you are confident the heat won’t pose a risk.  Be mindful that you don’t spray the fire with a strong jet of water.  Doing so may cause embers to shower the area and ignite your belongings. 

Make The Fire Escape Plan

8/30/2022 (Permalink)

If a fire strikes in your home, you won't have much time to react. Smoke inhalation can overwhelm a child or adult in less than two minutes. Be prepared by making a fire evacuation plan with your family so everyone makes it out of the house quickly and safely.

A Map, a Plan, an Assignment

First, sketch a map of your house's floor plan. Hold a family meeting, and familiarize your children with the map by pointing out where each room in the house is. Pasting a photo of each family member inside his or her respective bedroom on the map may help younger children. Once your children understand the map, draw a red line from each room to show the exit route. If possible, draw an alternate route out of each room through a window, in case the primary route is blocked. Then designate a meeting place outside for the family to gather that is a safe distance away from the house, such as the mailbox, and draw that place on the map. Post the evacuation plan on the refrigerator to keep it fresh in your family's mind.

Everyone in your family should have an assignment or responsibility in the event of an evacuation. Younger children should only focus on getting out according to the exit route. Have an adult account for the children and any pets getting out safely. Children who are old enough can be placed in charge of calling 9-1-1 once they are outside, or alerting a neighbor to call. This will help them see that they are an important part of the plan, and they need to take it seriously.

Teach Safety Techniques

Define, step-by-step, what you expect your children to do. Teach them to stay low to the floor, moving on their hands and knees, if there is smoke in their room. To avoid inhalation, instruct them to cover their face with a pillowcase or shirt. Show them how to crawl over to their bedroom door and touch the doorknob first. If it's hot, they should stand by their window and wave a shirt. If it's not hot, they should proceed out the door and exit the house to the meeting place outside. They should never attempt to pick up toys and personal possessions, or look for their parents, siblings, or pets. Sticking to the evacuation plan to get out safely is most important.

Conduct Drills

Let your children hear what a smoke detector going off sounds like. Tell them to follow the fire escape plan whenever they hear the smoke detector beeping. Practice this with periodic fire drills. Activate the smoke detector and work with your children so they don't forget what they are supposed to do. If they are having trouble, show them the map and repeat the plan until they have mastered it. With enough drills, you can avoid panic and confusion if a real fire strikes in the home.

Source: https://www.statefarm.com/simple-insights/residence/prepare-a-home-fire-evacuation-plan-with-your-family

Mold Remediation Experienced Professionals

7/26/2022 (Permalink)

Microscopic mold spores naturally occur almost everywhere, both outdoors and indoors. This makes it impossible to remove all mold from a home or business. Therefore, mold remediation reduces the mold spore count back to its natural or baseline level. Some restoration businesses advertise “mold removal” and even guarantee to remove all mold, which is a fallacy. Consider the following mold facts:

  • Mold is present almost everywhere, indoors and outdoors.
  • Mold spores are microscopic and float along in the air and may enter your home through windows, doors, or AC/heating systems or even hitch a ride indoors on your clothing or a pet.
  • Mold spores thrive on moisture. Mold spores can quickly grow into colonies when exposed to water. These colonies may produce allergens and irritants.
  • Before mold remediation can begin, any sources of water or moisture must be addressed. Otherwise, the mold may return.
  • Mold often produces a strong, musty odor and can lead you to possible mold problem areas.
  • Even higher-than-normal indoor humidity can support mold growth. Keep indoor humidity below 45 percent.

If your home or business has a mold problem, we can inspect and assess your property and use our specialized training, equipment, and expertise to remediate your mold infestation.

If You See Signs of Mold, Call Us Today – SERVPRO Elk Grove / Laguna 916-525-1241

Making A Fire Inventory List

7/22/2022 (Permalink)

The average home has approximately over 300,000 items. If a disaster such as a floor, fire, or theft were to destroy your home, would you recall all the detail necessary to provide a claim report to your insurance company?

In the event of a claim, insurers require you to substantiate your loss in as much detail as possible. “The last thing most of us want to do is spend a weekend documenting all our stuff. But almost as heartbreaking as losing a home to a disaster is trying to re-create a home inventory after the fact,” says Carole Walker, executive director of the Rocky Mountain Insurance Information Association.

The prospect of cataloguing everything you own can be daunting, but technology can help. Check whether your insurer offers any software, smartphone apps or other tools to help with the process. Both Allstate and Liberty Mutual have free apps that let you create an inventory of your personal property. The Allstate Digital Locker even allows you to store your inventory in the cloud. State Farm has a home inventory checklist anyone can download.

Now get organized. Dig out every receipt you can. Locate the make, model and serial numbers for appliances and electronics, usually on the back or bottom. If you purchased that refrigerator 10 years ago during a Black Friday sale and tossed the receipt, it’s okay. Open the door and look inside for a plate with the identifying information. Note the data or snap a picture of it.

Then proceed room by room. The quickest method is to make a video. Stand in the center of a room and narrate as you record. Film the entire space, including every wall, the ceiling and floor. Describe every item and feature, such as hardwood flooring or that pricey light fixture, to the best of your ability. Some detail is better than nothing.

Once it’s finished, don’t let your inventory become part of the loss. The most complete home inventory is worthless if you can’t get to it. Store it in the cloud, iCloud, Dropbox, OneDrive, etc. At a minimum, copy your files and any videos to a flash drive and give it to a friend or relative in another town, store it in a safe-deposit box, or email the file to yourself.

Are you already working through your own disaster? Call SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna at 916-525-1241 to help you through this time. SERVPRO's employees have been trained to help and assist you during this time. It can be an overwhelming time - SERVPRO will help you!

COVID-19 Measures To Take On

7/19/2022 (Permalink)

COVID-19 has hit multiple businesses in many different ways. Some are slowly beginning to re-open, while others have closed their doors for good. Here at SERVPRO of Elk Grove/Laguna, we are committed to getting your business as clean as possible. The first step to keeping you safe, is to keep our workers safe as well. Before we clean your infected or possibly infected area, we ensure that each of workers are wearing the following:

-Facial protection (at minimum a N-95 respirator)

-Nitrile gloves

-Protective eye wear

After we are properly equipped with the required gear, we move on to the next step, the cleaning process. When dealing with a virus like COVID-19, it is crucial to pay extra attention and be thorough with our procedures. 

Some materials cannot be cleaned with detergent and water without being damaged. Cleaning methods typically used on water sensitive materials such as vacuuming or dry sponging would not be capable of removing enough soil and residue to be effective. Carpets can be sanitized with SERVPROXIDE, and other porous materials like rugs, upholstered items, and draperies can be wet cleaned using a Hot Water Extraction and rinse method. 

ServpOXIDE is a hospital-grade disinfectant that has demonstrated effectiveness against similar viruses like SARS-CoV-2. It is EPA-approved, and proper PPE use is of the utmost importance. 

All tools and supplies are properly cleaned and disinfected to ensure there is no potential contamination to other parts of the structure. 

We want your business to be back on its feet in no time, trust us with your cleaning precaution needs. Please call us at (916) 525-1241 to answer any of your COVID-19 cleaning related questions. 

OSHA Guidelines For Proper Containment and Removal

7/14/2022 (Permalink)

Are you aware of the proper disposal of contaminated needles and blood tube holders?

From the OSHA website

Appropriate Disposal of Contaminated Sharps:

  • Employers must make available, closable, puncture resistant, leakproof sharps containers that are appropriately labeled and color-coded. The containers must also have an opening that is large enough to accommodate disposal of the entire blood collection assembly (i.e. blood tube holder and needle).
  • Employees must have access to sharps containers that are easily accessible to the immediate area where sharps are used (29 CFR 1910.1030(d)(4)(iii)(A)(2)(i)).
  • If employees travel from one location to another (e.g. from one patient room to another or from one facility to another), the employee must be provided with a sharps container which is conveniently placed or portable at each location/facility, and is capable of accommodating the entire blood tube holder and needle assembly.

Note: Many sharps containers are designed with openings that do not allow for disposal of a SESIP that is attached to the blood tube holder. These containers would not be in compliance with the bloodborne pathogens standard. Employers must ensure that where blood is being drawn, the sharps container is appropriate for immediate disposal of sharps.

Evaluation Toolbox

  • Employers must first evaluate, select, and use appropriate engineering controls (e.g., sharps with engineered sharps injury protection), which includes single-use blood tube holders with sharps with engineered sharps injury protection (SESIP) attached.
  • The use of engineering andwork practice controls provide the highest degree of control in order to eliminate potential injuries after performing blood draws. Disposing of blood tube holders with contaminated needles attached after the activation of the safety feature affords the greatest hazard control.
  • In very rare situations needle removal is acceptable.
    • If the employer can demonstrate that no feasible alternative to needle removal is available (e.g. inability to purchase single-use blood tube holders due to a supply shortage of these devices),
    • If the removal is necessary for a specific medical or dental procedure.

In these rare cases, the employer must ensure that the contaminated needle is protected by a SESIP prior to disposal. In addition, the employer must ensure that a proper sharps disposal container is located in the immediate area of sharps use and is easily accessible to employees. This information must be clearly detailed and documented in the employer's Exposure Control Plan.

  • If it is necessary to draw blood with a syringe, a syringe with engineered sharps injury protection must be used in which the protected needle is removed using safe work practices, and transfer of blood from the syringe to the tube must be done using a needleless blood transfer device.

For complete details visit: https://www.osha.gov/dts/shib/shib101503.html 

Have a biohazard clean up?  Call SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna 916-525-1241

3 Levels Of Commercial Loss

7/13/2022 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna handles not only residential damage and restoration but commercial as well.

There are three levels of commercial damage that are considered:

Level 1

Level 1 is a small commercial loss typically involving 15,000 square feet or less of affected floor space. If the facility was entirely affected, examples of a small commercial loss may include but are not limited to, a stand-alone retail establishment, a small church, a daycare facility, a small shopping center, a small warehouse or manufacturing facility, or a stand-alone administrative building. A Level 1 loss can also be a small portion of a much larger structure.

Level 2

Level 2 is a midsize commercial loss typically involving 15,000 to 60,000 square feet of affected floor space. The building or buildings involved are usually multi-level or greatly divided spaces. If the facility was entirely affected, examples of a Level 2 loss may include but are not limited to, a small multi-family property, a midsize church or school, a small shopping center, a multi-tenant administration facility, or a midsize warehouse or manufacturing facility. A Level 2 loss can also be just a portion of a much larger structure.

Level 3

Level 3 is a large commercial loss typically involving more than 60,000 square feet of affected floor space. The building or buildings involved will likely be large multi-level structures. If the facility was entirely affected, examples of a Level 3 loss can include, but are not limited to, a large church, hospital, school, or university; a large multi-family property; a mid- to high-rise retail or administration facility; a large industrial, manufacturing, or warehouse facility; or a large strip-style shopping center or shopping mall. This is the level at which it would be appropriate to refer to the project as a “large loss.”

Once our team determines the level of loss, the property is further assessed, and a team of appropriate size is dispatched to get the job done quickly and efficiently, and return your business to operation “Like it never even happened.”®

5 Types Of Fire Damage

7/13/2022 (Permalink)

  1. Cooking Equipment 

When a pot and pan splatter grease, it can take seconds to cause a fire. When cooking stay close by, especially if using oil or high temperatures. Keep combustibles away from the heat source (e.g. oven mitts, dish towels, paper towels).

  1. Electrical Equipment
  2. Make sure your outlets aren't overloaded 
  3. Don't have electrical wires under heavy equipment 
  4. Your Electrical appliances don't have loose or frayed cords/plugs

3.Candles 

Keep candles on a level surface, away from combustible materials and out of reach of children or pets. Always blow them out before leaving the house. 

  1. Barbecues 

Use Barbecues away from the house, deck rails, and tree limbs. Maintenance them on a regular basis, clean removable parts (inside and out) with soapy water. Check for potential leaks in the connections by spraying them with soapy water; Watch if bubbles form when you open the gas.

  1. Fire Pits
  2. You may need a permit depending on where you live to have a fire. 
  3. You have to have a permit if your fire is bigger than 2 ft tall and 3 ft diameter. 
  4. Keep at least 25 ft away from structures and tree limbs. 
  5. Use a screen over your fire to keep the sparks from flying 
  6. Keep a bucket of water or a hose close by.

Earthquake Safety

7/11/2022 (Permalink)

those risks.

Prepare Your Workforce to

  • React Safely
    Every employee, from top managers to part-time and temporary workers, needs to learn What to Do During an Earthquake. Safety orientations should emphasize safe places to "drop, cover, and hold on" during earthquake shaking and safe locations where people can rendezvous when the shaking has stopped and it is safe and advisable to evacuate your facilities.

    Hold periodic, mandatory earthquake drills to give employees opportunities to practice what they have learned and condition themselves to react spontaneously and safely when the first jolt or shaking is felt. To help protect workers in the immediate aftermath of earthquakes or other disasters, arrange for employees to be trained now in first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and the use of fire extinguishers. Earthquakes should be thoroughly integrated into the organization’s emergency preparedness, response, and recovery planning.
     
  • Help the Organization Survive a Damaging Earthquake
    Elements that are critical to ongoing business viability vary from one organization to another. They may include, for example, locations, equipment, telecommunications, supply chains, stored data, or employee knowledge or skills. A prepared workforce is one that has identified the elements that are important to its operations; made plans for protecting, reconstructing, duplicating, or surviving without these elements; and been adequately trained to carry out these plans in the event of an earthquake or other contingency. Visit Ready Businessfor more information on business-continuity and contingency planning.

    In the days following an earthquake, employees are more likely to be able to come to work and perform effectively if they are less worried about or preoccupied with their families and homes. They should be encouraged to prepare their homes and families in advance for earthquakes and other emergencies (see Earthquake Safety at Home).

Prepare Your Community

It makes good business sense for employers to contribute to the well-being of the communities from which they recruit employees, clients, and customers. There are many ways that businesses, acting either individually or collectively through organizations such as local chambers of commerce, can help strengthen the disaster resilience of their communities. Some of these ways include serving as local exemplars of organizational preparedness; promoting preparedness among suppliers, clients, and other business contacts; and sponsoring or participating in local earthquake drills, preparedness events, or awareness and education campaigns. Visit Quake Smart for more ideas.

Source: https://www.fema.gov/earthquake-safety-work