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Have Your Prepared Your Business for a Disaster?

10/4/2017 (Permalink)

We often prepare for disasters at home, but is your business prepared for an emergency? The Small Business Administration’s website has suggestions for disaster preparedness and recovery.

SBA's Disaster Preparedness and Recovery Plan

To view the complete Disaster Preparedness and Recovery Plan, please click here.

Executive Summary

At no time do communities, small businesses, and individuals more need access to the Small Business Administration’s (SBA’s) “3 C’s” of capital, counseling, and contracts more than in the wake of disaster.  SBA’s Disaster Preparedness and Recovery Plan (DPRP) ensures that all available agency resources are both provided and integrated into the federal government’s overall support to disaster survivors.

Recovery Cycle:  When focused on recovery, the 3 C’s are sequenced as capital, contracts, counseling, and capital again.  SBA’s immediate effort begins with the deployment of Disaster Assistance staff from one of its two Field Operations Centers (FOCs) to make disaster loans available to homeowners, renters, businesses of all sizes, and private nonprofits.  These physical and economic injury disaster loans are critical to repairing damage and sustaining cash flow in a community.  Almost as quickly, the Office of Government Contracting and Business Development (GCBD), often in concert with the local District Office, reaches out to other federal agencies to offer waivers and other contracting flexibilities to ensure the engagement of small businesses – especially ones in impacted communities – in the process of rebuilding and recovering.  Through counseling and technical assistance, small businesses are able to adjust their plans to account for the “new normal” after a disaster.  Ultimately, this is at the heart of successful recovery:  Small businesses, in combination, are sometimes the local economic engine, but they are almost always critical to a community’s character.  The recovery process can be said to have resolved into the business cycle when the final steps in small business recovery are financed with SBA Offices of Capital Access (OCA) and Investment and Innovation (OII) programs investing in that same “new normal.”

For more details visit: https://www.sba.gov/managing-business/running-business/emergency-preparedness/sbas-disaster-preparedness-and-recovery-plan 

SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna is here to help you during your business' disaster. Call 916-525-1241 24/7 for our help!

Visit our crew page.

SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna is here to take care of you – call 916-525-1241. Follow us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SERVPROelkgrovelaguna/ and online http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com.

Read what our customers are saying: http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com/testimonials

Moisture and Mold Prevention and Control Tips from SERVPRO Elk Grove / Laguna

10/4/2017 (Permalink)

Did you find something that looks like mold in your home or business?  Let SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna ease your mind and take care of the problem. Call us at 916-525-1241 for 24/7 emergency service.

The US EPA provides many details on their website around mold and moisture. 

Take a look at some of their tips:

  • When water leaks or spills occur indoors - act quickly. If wet or damp materials or areas are dried 24-48 hours after a leak or spill happens, in most cases mold will not grow.
  • Clean and repair roof gutters regularly.
  • Make sure the ground slopes away from the building foundation, so that water does not enter or collect around the foundation.
  • Keep air conditioning drip pans clean and the drain lines unobstructed and flowing properly.
  • Keep indoor humidity low. If possible, keep indoor humidity below 60 percent (ideally between 30 and 50 percent) relative humidity. Relative humidity can be measured with a moisture or humidity meter, a small, inexpensive ($10-$50) instrument available at many hardware stores.
  • If you see condensation or moisture collecting on windows, walls or pipes act quickly to dry the wet surface and reduce the moisture/water source. Condensation can be a sign of high humidity.

Need more information? Visit: https://www.epa.gov/mold/brief-guide-mold-moisture-and-your-home 

Have a mold problem today or just want to read more about how SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna can take care of your mold visit: http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com/mold-removal 

SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna is here to take care of you – call 916-525-1241. Follow us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SERVPROelkgrovelaguna/ and online http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com.

Read what our customers are saying: http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com/testimonials

Mold Testing in Your Home or Business – SERVPRO Elk Grove / Laguna

10/4/2017 (Permalink)

Did you find something that looks like mold in your home or business?  Let SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna ease your mind and take care of the problem. Call us at 916-525-1241 for 24/7 emergency service.

Learn a little more about mold testing or sampling from the EPA: 

Is sampling for mold needed? In most cases, if visible mold growth is present, sampling is unnecessary. Since no EPA or other federal limits have been set for mold or mold spores, sampling cannot be used to check a building's compliance with federal mold standards. Surface sampling may be useful to determine if an area has been adequately cleaned or remediated. Sampling for mold should be conducted by professionals who have specific experience in designing mold sampling protocols, sampling methods and interpreting results. Sample analysis should follow analytical methods recommended by the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA), the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), or other professional organizations.

Are there federal regulations or standards regarding mold testing?

Standards or Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) for airborne concentrations of mold, or mold spores, have not been set. Currently, there are no EPA regulations or standards for airborne mold contaminants.

For more information on mold visit: https://www.epa.gov/mold/mold-testing-or-sampling

For more details about SERVPRO's services visit: http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com/ 

SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna is here to take care of you – call 916-525-1241. Follow us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SERVPROelkgrovelaguna/ and online http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com.

Read what our customers are saying: http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com/testimonials

Are You Ready for a Big Storm to Hit Your Area?

10/4/2017 (Permalink)

When disaster strikes, SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna  is here to help.  We also pulled together some tips courtesy of the CDC:

Good basic personal hygiene and hand washing are critical to help prevent the spread of illness and disease. Clean, safe running water is essential for proper hygiene and hand washing.

Hygiene is especially important in an emergency such as a flood, hurricane, or earthquake, but finding clean, safe running water can sometimes be difficult. The following information will help to ensure good hygiene and hand-washing in the event of an emergency.

Disaster Supplies Kit (Hygiene Supplies)

Before an emergency, make sure you have created a Disaster Supplies Kit.
Hand-washing

Keeping hands clean during an emergency helps prevent the spread of germs. If your tap water is not safe to use, wash your hands with soap and water that has been boiled or disinfected. Follow these steps to make sure you wash your hands properly:

Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold) and apply soap.
Rub your hands together to make a lather and scrub them well; be sure to scrub the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
Continue rubbing your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the "Happy Birthday" song from beginning to end twice.
Rinse your hands well under running water.
Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.
A temporary hand washing station can be created by using a large water jug that contains clean water (for example, boiled or disinfected).

Washing hands with soap and water is the best way to reduce the number of germs on them. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of germs on hands in some situations, but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs.

Hand sanitizers are not effective when hands are visibly dirty.

Wash hands with soap and clean, running water (if available):

Before, during, and after preparing food
Before eating food
After using the toilet
After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
Before and after caring for someone who is sick
After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
After touching an animal or animal waste
After touching garbage
Before and after treating a cut or wound
Other Hand Hygiene Resources

Food and Water Safety and Hand Hygiene Resources
Handwashing: Clean Hands Save Lives
Do not use contaminated water to wash dishes, brush your teeth, wash and prepare food, or make ice.

Bathing

Bathing after a water-related emergency should only be done with clean, safe water. Listen to local authorities for further instructions. Sometimes water that is not safe to drink can be used for bathing.

Dental Hygiene

Brushing your teeth after a water-related emergency should only be done with clean, safe water. Listen to local authorities to find out if tap water is safe to use.
Visit the Safe Drinking Water for Personal Use page for more information about making your water safe for brushing your teeth.
You may visit CDC's Oral Health Web site for complete dental hygiene information.
Wound Care

Keeping wounds clean and covered is crucial during an emergency. If you have open cuts or sores, keep them as clean as possible by washing well with soap and clean, safe water to control infection. If a wound develops redness, swelling, or drainage, seek immediate medical attention.

When providing first aid for a wound, clean hands can help prevent infection (see Handwashing on this page). Visit Emergency Wound Care After a Natural Disaster to find complete information on caring for wounds.

Healthcare professionals should visit Emergency Wound Management for Healthcare Professionals and Management of Vibrio vulnificus Wound Infections After a Disaster.

For complete details visit: https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/floods/sanitation.html 

For more details about SERVPRO's services visit: http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com/ 

SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna is here to take care of you – call 916-525-1241. Follow us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SERVPROelkgrovelaguna/ and online http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com.

Read what our customers are saying: http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com/testimonials

Is It Time to Test Your Business for a Disaster?

10/4/2017 (Permalink)

Disasters can wreck havocs on our homes and businesses. Testing your business system can ensure you are ready for a disaster large or small. On Preparemybusiness.org you can find suggestions and details around business continuity planning.

Testing is a critical component of business continuity planning. If your systems went down, how long would it take to get them up and running again, and what would be required to achieve that goal? Where are the gaps in your recovery plan and how can you close those gaps before a disaster strikes?

Testing your continuity plan is the best way to ensure that your business will remain in operation no matter what, or that it can be quickly restored under any circumstances. For many companies, testing is necessary for meeting compliance requirements.

Through testing, you will reduce both recovery time and risks, ultimately protecting your business and the employees and customers who rely on you.

What to test?

You should test all critical functions, particularly those that would be most vulnerable during an attack or disaster. This includes servers, PCs/workstations, network/Internet, building security, phones/communications, supply chain, workflow/staff procedures. Some managers phase their testing procedures, for instance, running a data recovery test one month and network/Internet recovery another month.

Where to test?

Testing can be done in one of three places: at your facility, at your backup center, or at an offsite testing site. You can choose to do a table-top-meeting-style run through or a full-scale hands-on test, using canned or live data.

How often to test?

We recommend that you do a full-scale test annually for a wide range of critical functions, including electricity, water, gas, facilities/spacing, staffing, technology, telecommunications and more. A full-scale test will help ensure that your business not only survive but thrive in any unexpected situation.

Who should participate?

A testing team should include all the people on your disaster recovery team or who are in charge of critical areas within the company. These should include, but not be limited to Facilities manager, IT tech, HR manager, senior management, brand management, third-party support and a sampling of critical clients.

Recovering from a disaster, call SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna at 916-525-1241 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We are here to help.

For more details about preparing your business, visit: http://www.preparemybusiness.org.

For more details about SERVPRO's services visit: http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com/ 

SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna is here to take care of you – call 916-525-1241. Follow us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SERVPROelkgrovelaguna/ and online http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com.

Read what our customers are saying: http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com/testimonials

What is the True Cost of Flood? Water Damage is Costly.

10/4/2017 (Permalink)

Understanding Your Flood Risk is Vital in Preparation. 

Do you understand your true flood risk? Are you and your family prepared? On FloodSmart.gov you can find information to prepare you including the cost of flooding.  It only takes a few inches of water to cause major damage to your home and its contents. Use the online tool to show you what a flood does to your home and what it could cost, inch by inch.

Preparing for a flood is vital. Guard your home and businesses. 

For more information on the true cost of a flood visit: https://www.floodsmart.gov/floodsmart/pages/flooding_flood_risks/the_cost_of_flooding.jsp

Interested in knowing how SERVPRO can help you during your flood visit: http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com/storm-flooding-restoration

Are you faced with water damage?  Call SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna at 916-525-1241. We are here to help 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Visit our crew page.

For more information on our company click here.

SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna is here to take care of you – call 916-525-1241. Follow us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SERVPROelkgrovelaguna/ and online http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com.

Read what our customers are saying: http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com/testimonials

Keeping Your Family Safe During Halloween from Fire Risks

10/4/2017 (Permalink)

Halloween is a fun time of year, but without precautions it can lead to house fires. The Cal Fire website offers some great tips and suggestions to keep Halloween safe and fun.

If you are faced with fire damage, call SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna at 916-525-1241 for 24/7 emergency service.

TIPS FOR CHOOSING THE RIGHT COSTUMES:

Purchase costumes made of flame resistant or retardant material (Check the label). Fire resistant does not mean fire proof
Keep hemlines short enough to prevent tripping
Avoid loose and baggy sleeves. Stay away from billowing or long trailing fabric.
Use make-up instead of masks which can obstruct vision.
Use glow in the dark reflective tape on your costume.

TIPS FOR DECORATING:

Never use candles to light jack-o’-lanterns, use battery powered lights.
Instruct children to stay away from open flames.
Be extremely careful with cornstalks and other harvest season items. Keep them away from sources of heat.
Keep exits clear of decorations so nothing blocks escape routes


TIPS FOR HALLOWEEN NIGHT:

Children should always go trick-or-treating with a responsible adult.
If driving, be sure to watch for trick-or-treaters who are too busy to watch for you.
Provide children with flashlights or glow sticks to carry for lighting and visibility.
Do not allow children to carry sharp sticks or other objects that could cause injury to others.
Keep your yard free of tripping hazards, such as garden tools, hoses, etc.
Closely inspect all candy before allowing children to eat it. Discard any unwrapped treats from a stranger. If in doubt, throw it out.

For more details visit http://www.fire.ca.gov/communications/communications_firesafety_halloween 

Visit http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com/fire-smoke-damage-restoration to find out how SERVPRO can help you during a fire emergency. 

Keep Your Family Safe From Fire During the Holidays

10/4/2017 (Permalink)

Cooking fires are common during Thanksgiving and the holidays. The US Fire Administration has quite a few tips and suggestions on their website to help with fire safety during the holidays. 

If you or your loved one has recently suffered from a fire, be sure to contact SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna to help you with your restoration needs. Call us 24/7 at 916-525-1241. 

Are you considering frying a turkey for Thanksgiving?  Please consider the 

Five dangers of deep frying a turkey:

  1. Turkey fryers can easily tip over, spilling hot cooking oil over a large area.
  2. An overfilled cooking pot will cause cooking oil to spill when the turkey is put in, and a partially frozen turkey will cause cooking oil to splatter when put in the pot.
  3. Even a small amount of cooking oil spilling on a hot burner can cause a large fire.
  4. Without thermostat controls, deep fryers can overheat oil to the point of starting a fire.
  5. The sides of the cooking pot, lid and pot handles can get dangerously hot.

For more information visit the US Fire Administration website: https://www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/cooking.html

To find out other ways SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna can help you with fire or storm damage, visit: http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com/ 

As always, call us at 916-525-1241. We are here to help. 

Do you know the proper way to set up a hand-washing station after a storm?

9/28/2017 (Permalink)

When disaster strikes, SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna is here to help.  We also pulled together some tips courtesy of the CDC:

Good basic personal hygiene and hand washing are critical to help prevent the spread of illness and disease. Clean, safe running water is essential for proper hygiene and hand washing.

Hygiene is especially important in an emergency such as a flood, hurricane, or earthquake, but finding clean, safe running water can sometimes be difficult. The following information will help to ensure good hygiene and handwashing in the event of an emergency.

Disaster Supplies Kit (Hygiene Supplies)

Before an emergency, make sure you have created a Disaster Supplies Kit.
Handwashing

Keeping hands clean during an emergency helps prevent the spread of germs. If your tap water is not safe to use, wash your hands with soap and water that has been boiled or disinfected. Follow these steps to make sure you wash your hands properly:

Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold) and apply soap.
Rub your hands together to make a lather and scrub them well; be sure to scrub the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
Continue rubbing your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the "Happy Birthday" song from beginning to end twice.
Rinse your hands well under running water.
Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.
A temporary hand washing station can be created by using a large water jug that contains clean water (for example, boiled or disinfected).

Washing hands with soap and water is the best way to reduce the number of germs on them. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of germs on hands in some situations, but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs.

Hand sanitizers are not effective when hands are visibly dirty.

When to Wash HandsPhoto of cupped hands under running water.

Wash hands with soap and clean, running water (if available):

Before, during, and after preparing food
Before eating food
After using the toilet
After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
Before and after caring for someone who is sick
After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
After touching an animal or animal waste
After touching garbage
Before and after treating a cut or wound
Other Hand Hygiene Resources

Food and Water Safety and Hand Hygiene Resources
Handwashing: Clean Hands Save Lives
Do not use contaminated water to wash dishes, brush your teeth, wash and prepare food, or make ice.

Bathing

Bathing after a water-related emergency should only be done with clean, safe water. Listen to local authorities for further instructions. Sometimes water that is not safe to drink can be used for bathing.

Dental Hygiene

Brushing your teeth after a water-related emergency should only be done with clean, safe water. Listen to local authorities to find out if tap water is safe to use.
Visit the Safe Drinking Water for Personal Use page for more information about making your water safe for brushing your teeth.
You may visit CDC's Oral Health Web site for complete dental hygiene information.
Wound Care

Keeping wounds clean and covered is crucial during an emergency. If you have open cuts or sores, keep them as clean as possible by washing well with soap and clean, safe water to control infection. If a wound develops redness, swelling, or drainage, seek immediate medical attention.

When providing first aid for a wound, clean hands can help prevent infection (see Handwashing on this page). Visit Emergency Wound Care After a Natural Disaster to find complete information on caring for wounds.

Healthcare professionals should visit Emergency Wound Management for Healthcare Professionals and Management of Vibrio vulnificus Wound Infections After a Disaster.

For complete details visit: https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/floods/sanitation.html 

SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna is here to take care of you – call 916-525-1241. Follow us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SERVPROelkgrovelaguna/ and online http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com.

Read what our customers are saying: http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com/testimonials

Do You Know These 10 Things About Mold?

9/28/2017 (Permalink)

Mold can be found just about anywhere. There is a lot of good information, but many people do not have a solid understanding of mold. SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna is your specialist for mold remediation.

However, you may be interested in finding out if the mold you have in your home is something to be concerned about.  The US Environmental Protection Agency's website has a great deal of information to help a home owner or renter. 

Ten Things You Should Know about Mold:

  1. Potential health effects and symptoms associated with mold exposures include allergic reactions, asthma and other respiratory complaints.
  2. There is no practical way to eliminate all mold and mold spores in the indoor environment; the way to control indoor mold growth is to control moisture.
  3. If mold is a problem in your home or school, you must clean up the mold and eliminate sources of moisture.
  4. Fix the source of the water problem or leak to prevent mold growth.
  5. Reduce indoor humidity (to 30-60%) to decrease mold growth by:
    • Venting bathrooms, dryers and other moisture-generating sources to the outside
    • Using air conditioners and de-humidifiers
    • Increasing ventilation
    • Using exhaust fans whenever cooking, dishwashing and cleaning
  6. Clean and dry any damp or wet building materials and furnishings within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth.
  7. Clean mold off hard surfaces with water and detergent, and dry completely. Absorbent materials such as ceiling tiles, that are moldy, may need to be replaced.
  8. Prevent condensation: Reduce the potential for condensation on cold surfaces (i.e., windows, piping, exterior walls, roof, or floors) by adding insulation.
  9. In areas where there is a perpetual moisture problem, do not install carpeting (i.e., by drinking fountains, by classroom sinks, or on concrete floors with leaks or frequent condensation).
  10. Molds can be found almost anywhere; they can grow on virtually any substance, providing moisture is present. There are molds that can grow on wood, paper, carpet, and foods.

For more details visit: https://www.epa.gov/mold/ten-things-you-should-know-about-mold

SERVPRO of Elk Grove / Laguna is here to take care of you – call 916-525-1241. Follow us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SERVPROelkgrovelaguna/ and online http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com.

Read what our customers are saying: http://www.SERVPROelkgrovelaguna.com/testimonials